Meet our Speakers

We are excited to announce some of the confirmed speakers. The “Peopling History of Africa” Conference brings together a number of outstanding international researchers active in different fields. Click through the list of speakers to see their profiles and session topics.

Sarah Tishkoff

Sarah Tishkoff — keynote speaker

University of Pennsylvania, USA | @SarahTishkoff

Dr. Tishkoff studies genomic and phenotypic variation in ethnically diverse Africans. Her research combines field work, laboratory research, and computational methods to examine African population history and how genetic variation can affect a wide range of practical issues – for example, why humans have different susceptibility to disease, how they metabolize drugs, and how they adapt through evolution.

Jean-Jacques Hublin

Jean-Jacques Hublin

Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany | @jjhublin

Professor Jean-Jacques Hublin is the Director of the Department of Human Evolution at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig. He is an honorary Professor at the University of Leipzig and a part-time Professor at Leiden University. He has been a pioneer in the field of virtual paleoanthropology. The origins of Neandertals and Homo sapiens, and most notably, the interactions between the two groups have occupied a central place in his career.

Pontus Skoglund

Pontus Skoglund

Francis Crick Institute, London, UK | @pontus_skoglund

Pontus Skoglund is the group leader of the Francis Crick Institute's Ancient Genomics laboratory. Originally from Sweden, he obtained his PhD in evolutionary genetics from Uppsala University in 2013, and thereafter did his postdoctoral research in David Reich's laboratory at Harvard Medical School's Department of Genetics.

Carina Schlebusch

Carina Schlebusch

Uppsala University, Sweden | @cschlebu

In my research I use genetics as a tool to investigate human history. My special interest and expertise in the population history of Africa allow me the opportunity to investigate both recent population movements, associated with farming, as well as deep human history, which is rooted in Africa.

Cristian Capelli

Cristian Capelli

University of Oxford, UK

Cristian Capelli’s research focuses on human evolution, with a particular attention to the processes (cultural and historical] that have shaped the distribution of genetic variation across human populations. Current projects address the historical events that led to the peopling of the Mediterranean region and the European continent, and the pattern of migration and admixture in Sub-Sahara Africa.

David Comas

David Comas

University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain

The interests of our research are focused on the human genome diversity analysis in order to infer the (genomic and population] processes responsible for this diversity and try to establish the (population and epidemiological] consequences of the human genetic variability. Thus, our main research lines are focused on aspects of human genome diversity, population genetics, genome variation and disease susceptibility, and genome evolution and disease.

Audrey Sabbagh

Audrey Sabbagh

University Paris-Descartes, France

Audrey Sabbagh holds a faculty position as Associate Professor at Paris Descartes University and leads the "Host genetic adaptation" team in the UMR 216 IRD MERIT research unit. She has devoted much of her research interests to the analysis of human genetic variation both from an epidemiological and evolutionary perspective and in terms of disease susceptibility and drug response. She authored 63 research articles in peer-reviewed journals. In 2018 she was nominated as Junior Member of the IUF (Institut Universitaire de France). She is the principal investigator of the multidisciplinary research project BAObAB (Biocultural AdaptatiOn to malaria in Atakora, north Benin) which aims to identify the biological and cultural factors underlying the relative resistance to malaria of the Fulani people.

Alicia Sanchez-Mazas

Alicia Sanchez-Mazas

University of Geneva, Switzerland

Professor Alicia Sanchez-Mazas conducts research projects on human populations’ genetic diversity in relation to the peopling history of modern humans worldwide, with a main focus on the genes of the major histocompatibility complex, HLA. During the last years, she extended her research interests to the molecular evolution of these genes in relation to environmental factors and human diseases. She published key papers on African populations' genetic history and co-edited two books (Routledge) on the peopling of East Asia and one special volume (Human Heredity) on the genetic diversity of European populations.

Viktor Cerny

Viktor Cerny

Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic

Viktor Černý is senior researcher at the Institute of Archaeology in Prague, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic. His interests lie mainly in the genetic structure of sub-Saharan African populations, the first human settlements of Eurasia, the impacts of subsistence strategies on the genetic profile of human populations as evidenced through the contemporary genetic diversity. He is the author or co-author of some seventy papers in specialised journals in anthropology and archaeology, including international journals in the field of human population genetics. His works show that interdisciplinary collaboration between humanities (archaeology, ethnography, linguistic) and biomedical sciences (genetics, physical anthropology) can bring new insights into our past and present.

Estella Poloni

Estella Poloni

University of Geneva, Switzerland

The evolution of genetic and genomic diversity in human populations, and its relation to the history of migrations and cultural differentiations – such as the history of languages or the adoption of new subsistence strategies – are Dr Estella Poloni’s central research interests. She investigates such evolutionary imprints in genes involved in interactions between the organism and its chemical and dietary environment, which are potential targets of selective pressures. Such studies involve analyses of diversity patterns in samples of human populations and other primate species, of which the chimpanzees, and include GWAS of pharmacogenetic traits.

Philip van Peer

Philip van Peer

University of Louvain, Belgium | @philipvanpeer

Philip Van Peer is head of the Prehistoric Archaeology research group at the University of Leuven, Belgium. Throughout his career he has taken an interest in Palaeolithic hunting and gathering populations in both northern Africa and western Europe. His PhD (1988) was on variation in technological systems of the Middle Palaeolithic. Later on, as a postdoctoral research fellow of the Fund for Scientific Research-Flanders and since 2003 as full Professor of Prehistory at University of Leuven, his focus shifted to the economies in which such systems were deployed. This line of research was fed by fieldwork in the Lower Nile Valley and in the Red Sea Mountains of Egypt, in the context of the Belgian Middle Egypt Prehistoric Project. In northern Sudan he has led the excavation of early Middle Stone Age site 8-B-11, as a partner in an international project promoted by Université de Lille III.

Eric Huysecom

Eric Huysecom

University of Geneva, Switzerland

Eric Huysecom is Professor of African Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Geneva (UniGE) and Special Advisor to the Rectorate for Africa. His scientific research has focused in particular on the Prehistory of sub-Saharan Africa with a special insight on the emergence of the Neolithic in Africa and the processes of neolithisation, as well as on different fields of historical archaeology like the archaeology of the pre-colonial European settlements in the heart of the continent. Since 1997, he has been coordinating the International and Interdisciplinary Research Programme « Human Population and Paleoenvironment in Africa », that includes a major component devoted to Palaeolithic industries.

Katja Douze

Katja Douze

University of Geneva, Switzerland

Dr Katja Douze’s research aims unveiling past behaviors, and their changes over time, based on lithic industries from the African Palaeolithic. She work more specifically on the Middle Stone Age period (ca. 300ka-20ka] which is known for the emergence of Homo sapiens, their first behavioral developments and their first diffusions within and out of Africa

Savino di Lernia

Savino di Lernia

Roma, La Sapienza, Italy

Prof. Savino di Lernia is an Africanist archaeologist based at Sapienza University of Rome, where he teaches “Prehistoric Ethnography of Africa” and “Ethnoarchaeology”. His main research interests focus on social differentiations within hunter-gatherers’ societies and on the analysis of pathways to complexity among Pastoral Neolithic groups in Northern Africa, with a particular attention to rock art and ritual aspects. His fieldwork activity is mostly concentrated in the Sahara (Libya and Tunisia) where he held more than 35 expeditions. More recently expanded his fieldwork in East Africa, in the region of Lake Turkana (Kenya).

Dorian Fuller

Dorian Fuller

University College of London, UK | @dqfuller

Dorian Fuller's introduction bio will be available shortly.

Louis Champion

Louis Champion

University of Geneva, Switzerland

Louis Champion's introduction bio will be available shortly.

Koen Bostoen

Koen Bostoen

Gent University, Belgium

Koen Bostoen's introduction bio will be available shortly.

Johannes Krause

Johannes Krause

Max Planck Institute, Jena, Germany

Prof. Dr. Krause focuses on the analysis of ancient DNA to investigate such topics as pathogens from historic and prehistoric epidemics, human genetic history and human evolution. He has also contributed to deciphering Neanderthal genetics and the shared genetic heritage of Neanderthals and modern humans.

Hiba Babiker

Hiba Babiker

Max Planck Institute, Jena, Germany

Hiba Babiker is a post-doctoral researcher, and her work focuses on human genetic diversity and patterns of migration inside Africa. Her research couples fieldwork with the collection of genealogical data and biological samples. Her research is currently dedicated to revealing the genetic structure and history of populations across the Bandiagara Escarpment in Central Eastern Mali and populations across South-West Burkina Faso using genome-wide data and uni-parental markers. She is also interested in using recent advancement in aDNA technology to explore past populations' settlements in the region before the Dogon expansion. She is working closely with linguists to generate paired linguistic-genetic data to understand modern-day linguistic and genetic diversity shaped by the demographic histories of the populations.

Anne Mayor

Anne Mayor

University of Geneva, Switzerland

Anne Mayor is interested in understanding the evolution of techniques, changes in foodways and the peopling history of complex societies in West Africa during the last three millennia. She explores the links between material cultures and identities in the present and the past, through ethno-archaeological and archaeological fieldwork. She is involved in various collaborations for laboratory analysis in the fields of archaeo-material studies (ceramics, iron, glass) and bio-archaeology (archaeo-zoology, archaeo-botany, biological anthropology. She is currently responsible for a research project which aims at understanding population relatedness, mobility patterns, diet variability, diseases and funerary practices in the Dogon Country (Mali), combining data from bio-anthropology, stable isotopes genetics, archaeology and ethnography.

Nonhlanhla Dlamini

Nonhlanhla Dlamini

University of Geneva, Switzerland

Dr. Nonhlanhla DLAMINI is a biological anthropologist, who obtained her PhD in 2014 from the University of Cape Town. Her interest in developing a more nuanced understanding of African history hopes to foster well-informed connections and comparisons about the many biologically and culturally diverse populations of sub-Saharan Africa. She uses biological tools, mainly stable isotopes and dental anthropology, to investigate and reconstruct past life ways of sub-Saharan Africans before contact. Currently a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Geneva, her present research focuses on diet variability and economy, diseases, population relatedness, and geographic origins and mobility of past societies in central Mali before and after the arrival of the Dogon.

Scott MacEachern

Scott MacEachern

Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan, China | @smaceachern2

I am an archaeologist specialising in research on the Neolithic, Iron Age and precolonial history of the Lake Chad Basin, in Central Africa. My current efforts involve: (1] a project on anthropic landscape changes in the Benue River Valley of Cameroon during the Iron Age; (2] a recently published book situating the terrorist organisation Boko Haram in the context of frontier processes of violence and wealth creation south of Lake Chad; and (3] work on cultural heritage management in Central/West Africa, in the context of development and resource-extraction efforts.

Francesco d’Errico

Francesco d’Errico

CNRS, Bordeaux, France & University of Bergen, Norway

Francesco d’Errico is Director of Research (Exceptional Class) at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, attached to the University of Bordeaux, and Professor at the Centre for Early Sapiens Behaviour, University of Bergen. Most of d’Errico research has revolved around the questions of how and when we became humans, what mechanisms and factors have most contributed to this process and, in particular, when did cognitive abilities and cultures comparable to ours have emerged in our lineage. He has explored these topics by discovering and analysing the earliest examples of symbolic material culture in Africa, Europe, the Near East and China. the process of Neandertal extinction, and the impact of climate change on Palaeolithic populations.

Mary Prendergast

Mary Prendergast

Saint Louis University of Madrid, Spain | @prendydigs

Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Saint Louis University in Madrid, Spain, Mary Prendergast’s research addresses human diets and relationships among diet, land use and social organization. This broad topic has enabled her to study eras ranging from the emergence of our genus to historic times, and environments as diverse as eastern African grasslands, subtropical Asian woodlands, and the river valleys of glacial Europe.